Pr. Don Tilley, UC Berkeley, USA

Website link

Professor Tilley’s group has had a long-standing interest in silicon chemistry, and in particular the interactions of reactive silicon species, including silylenes, silylynes, silenes, and sigma-Si–H silanes, with transition metal centers. In general research in his group involves exploratory synthetic, structural, and reactivity studies on novel inorganic and organometallic systems, and discovery of new chemical transformations. Reactivity studies are guided by mechanistic investigations that shed light on how reactions proceed. Metal-mediated routes to new polymers are explored, and molecular, chemical approaches to the designed construction of advanced solid-state materials and heterogeneous catalysts are also being developed.

Pr Kim Baines, Western University, Canada

Website link

Her research focuses on the synthesis and reactivity of low valent main group molecules, especially in Groups 13 and 14, with novel bonding paradigms with the goal of providing new compounds for innovative chemistry and materials. She was awarded a Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany in 2015 and the Montreal Medal from the Chemical Institute of Canada in 2016. She serves on the executive of the Canadian Society for Chemistry and is currently the Past-President.

Pr David Scheschkewitz, University of Saarland, Germany

Website link

His main scientific interests concern (1) the syntheses of heavy alkene homologues and the peripheral functionalization of heavier double bonds, (2) unsaturated yet stable small Group 14 clusters and their derivatization as well as (3) low-valent Group 14 ligands for transition metal complexes and their role in the activation of small molecules and catalysis.

Pr Kazuyuki Kuroda, Waseda University, Japan

Website link

His current research interests mainly include inorganic materials chemistry focusing on mesostructured materials, intercalation chemistry, silicate chemistry, inorganic polymers, sol-gel chemistry, inorganic-organic hybrids, and self-organized materials. Many researches have mainly been related to Si-containing materials.

Pr Clément Sanchez, Collège de France, France

Website link

Research interests and fields of expertise:

  • Sol-Gel chemistry from metal alkoxides precursors
  • Templated synthesis of inorganic gels and mesoporous coatings (self-assembly)
  • Designed construction of hybrid organic-inorganic materials (metal oxides based on Si, Sn, Ti, Zr…)
  • Optical, electrical and mechanical properties of hybrid materialsSoft chemistry based routes to nanostructured materials. Sustainable chemistry (chimie douce)
  • Bio-inspired approaches to hierarchically structured inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic materials
  • Hybrid Biomaterials
  • Applications of hybrids in the domains of environment, health and energy

Pr Carole Perry, Nottingham Trent University, UK

Website link

She was head of the chemistry department from 2003-2008. Carole has been working on aspects of the chemistry of ‘Si’ since arriving in the Williams lab (R.J.P. Williams, F.R.S.) for her undergraduate project where she was handed a jar of white powder to investigate. The fibrous material of plant origin had been implicated in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer and was thus thought to be crystalline in nature like asbestos- this was not the case and so started her exploration of ‘all things silica’ over thirty-five years ago. Since then she has explored the nature of biological, geological and synthetic silicas, developed new methods to study the chemistry of the surface and explored the activity of the element (in some form) in nature and in synthetic and biological constructs. Current studies include the development of silk-silica constructs for bone repair, the generation of new bio-inspired materials for catalysis, the development of new microscopy techniques to probe the surface chemistry of silica structures within a living organism, investigations of the effect of silica and silica derived materials on cell behaviour and the role of ‘silicon’ in bone health.

Dr. Barry Arkles, Gelest Inc., USA, Winner of the Kipping Award 2020

Website link

Barry Arkles has been instrumental in introducing products derived from silicon chemistry into new commercial applications including advanced thermoplastic composites, oxygen permeable contact lenses, enzyme and cell immobilization, and interlayer dielectrics and barriers for semiconductors. He brings an academic approach to industrial endeavors. These efforts have resulted in over 200 publications and patents in addition to two highly successful silicon-based companies which have created hundreds of technology-based jobs. He currently is President and Chief Technical Officer of Gelest Inc.